Blood Sugar Balance

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Foods for Blood Sugar Balance

Author

Heather Pratt, MNT, BCHN

The season of justified overindulgence is fast approaching—really, when else do you have the excuse to gorge on massive second (or third) helpings, drink your weight in eggnog, and over-satisfy your sweet tooth? Most people worry about putting on a...



Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Take Control of Your Health: Learning how to prevent and reverse Metabolic Syndrome may be the single best thing you can do for your health.

Throw around the term Metabolic Syndrome and you’ll likely be met with puzzled expressions, but this condition is extremely common. Metabolic Syndrome affects an estimated two-thirds of all Americans and its rates are on the rise.Developing Metabolic Syndrome puts one at greater risk of a multitude of chronic diseases like heart disease, cancer, and particularly adult onset diabetes. In fact, Metabolic Syndrome is often referred to as pre-diabetes. Now the good news! This condition and its symptoms are in your control – very preventable and reversible; all it takes is the right approach. Start with healthy and delicious meals, add...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Individual Needs

Listen to Your Body Protein needs vary dramatically among individuals, due to numerous factors such as stress levels. If you are under stress, you need more protein than if you are not. According to Robert Crayhon, M.S., C.N.S., author of Robert Crayhon's Nutrition Made Simple, people with hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, yeast overgrowth, and food allergies usually need more protein. Protein requirements also change throughout life.[1] Because many factors affect optimal protein intake, the best way to determine how much protein you should eat is to experiment with different amounts and see how you feel. Common symptoms that can signal a...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Lindsay Wilson

The Path to Vibrant Health is a Healthy Inner Ecosystem: A world of bacteria living in our bodies can make or break our health

Called one of the top scientific discoveries of the 21st century, the human microbiome—the collection of microorganisms living in and on our bodies—is as important to human health as the human genome. The microbes that inhabit the human body can determine if we are obese or lean, how often (and severely) we get sick, if we develop gastrointestinal diseases, and if we suffer from mental illness. And while these may seem like very different health conditions, they often occur together and likely share a common denominator—an inner ecosystem out of balance. As it turns out, we are only as healthy...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

The Type-2 Diabetes Epidemic… And Nutritional Ways to Stop It In Its Tracks

The numbers are as alarming as they are depressing. Two of every three American adults are now overweight or obese. Upwards of 100 million have some form of prediabetes, also called glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome. Twenty-five million Americans have type-2 diabetes, and one million graduate from prediabetes to full-blown type-2 diabetes each year. Overweight and blood sugar disorders dramatically increase the risk of coronary heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and even cancer. Whatever kind of health care system you might envision, the future spells disaster. That is, unless we start focusing on “self care,” says Ron Hunninghake, M.D., medical director of...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Have you had your 50 heaping teaspoons of sugar today? The average American consumes between 150 and 200 pounds of refined sugar per year![1] In excess, refined sugar can be toxic – plain and simple. Artificial sweeteners are even more so. Our bodies were not designed to cope with the enormous quantities of sugar we routinely ingest. Our craving for sweets is not inherently bad, but what we choose to curb those cravings with can dramatically determine how we feel, both short and long term. Stevia, or more accurately stevia rebaudiana, is one excellent way to limit or altogether avoid...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Lindsay Wilson

Resveratrol’s lesser known (but no less powerful) cousin

Have you heard of pterostilbene? If you’re like most people, you probably haven’t. A relative newcomer to the supplement scene, pterostilbene (terro-still-bean) is chemically related to the antioxidant resveratrol and shares many of the same characteristics and health benefits, but offers its own unique advantages, including better absorption and bioavailability. Resveratrol and pterostilbene are both stilbene compounds, naturally-occurring substances found in certain plants, including grapes and blueberries (pterostilbene is primarily found in blueberries). Biologically, they act as phytoalexins, phytochemicals that are part of the plants’ defense system against certain pathogens, including fungi and bacteria. In humans, in addition to their...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN)

There are No Safety Issues With Fish Oil

Washington D.C., March 2, 2010 - In response to a press conference today held to announce a lawsuit against fish oil dietary supplement manufacturers and retailers, the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), the leading trade association representing the dietary supplement industry, issued the following statement: Statement by Andrew Shao, Ph.D., senior vice president, scientific and regulatory affairs, CRN: “Fish oil supplements are among the safest, most beneficial health products on the market.  Today’s announcement of a lawsuit against companies manufacturing or selling popular products is just that—a lawsuit looking for media attention, not a public safety concern for consumers.” CRN...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Heather Pratt, MNT, BCHN

Singin’ the No-Breakfast Blues?

Each morning when Miss Maclear’s class begins the day she is prepared to deal with some students who will not be able to focus or remember the information covered in class. She can predict which students will ask questions and excel and which will struggle to merely be present in class. Miss Maclear doesn’t just have a teacher’s intuition; she is armed with the knowledge of which children ate breakfast that morning and which did not. And she knows that will make all the difference. We have all heard it before—breakfast is the most important meal of the day. For...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

Blood Sugar, Insulin, and the Brain: Could Alzheimer’s Disease Be “Type 3 Diabetes?”

We know that the brain is especially sensitive to blood sugar levels, and that our moods track right behind our blood sugar. Case in point: when your blood sugar is low, you’re more likely to be irritable and impatient. But some doctors now believe that problems with blood sugar and insulin are major factors in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Just like the rest of the body, the brain can develop its own form of diabetes, a condition that has been dubbed “type 3 diabetes” by Suzanne de la Monte, M.D., Ph.D., a neuropathologist at the Brown Medical School, in...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Lindsay Wilson

A Silent and Deadly Epidemic: Vitamin D can protect the heart, lower the risk of some cancers, treat seasonal affective disorder, and much more, but most people aren’t getting optimal levels of this essential vitamin.

A supplement that could significantly cut the risk of developing diseases and health problems as varied as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis, depression and seasonal affective disorder, congestive heart failure, both types of diabetes, menopausal symptoms, musculoskeletal pain, and several cancers including breast, colon, prostate, pancreatic, and ovarian cancers should make headline news, right? If it was a new pharmaceutical drug, perhaps, but we’re not talking about the latest newfangled drug—we’re talking about vitamin D, a powerhouse in its own right. Extensive research has shown that insufficient levels of vitamin D increase the risk of developing the diseases and...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Stephanie Briggs

Originally, “pycnogenols” referred to oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs) extracted from various plants (including grape seeds) and separated from their tannins. OPCs are chains of up to 5 units of proanthocyanidins (a category of flavonoids), such as catechins.  “Pycnogenol” was later trademarked in the United States and now refers only to a mixture of compounds, including OPCs, extracted from the bark of the French maritime pine tree. Pycnogenol contains many antioxidants. However, there is no certainty that, once absorbed and metabolized, the compounds retain their antioxidant function. Nevertheless, compounds of Pycnogenol produce preventive and therapeutic effects in the body, as shown by...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

The Alpha of Antioxidants: Slow Aging, Fight Disease, Balance Blood Sugar, and Increase Energy

Lipoic acid, often referred to as alpha-lipoic acid or thioctic acid, is joining the reputable ranks of well-respected nutrients like vitamins E and C. This vitamin-like nutrient has a powerful role in quenching disease-causing free radicals and regenerating other antioxidants. It is also showing real promise for slowing the aging process, helping stabilize blood sugar, as well as protecting and supporting the health of eyes, nerves, heart, and liver. There’s more! This unique nutrient is often referred to as the “universal” antioxidant due to its ability to impact both water and fat-soluble tissues. Combine these notable attributes, and this nutrient...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Perhaps you are interested in increasing your energy, losing some weight, or preventing depression and mood swings. What about reducing pain and inflammation or cutting your risk of heart disease and cancer? One of the best ways to do all these things is to increase your intake of omega-3 fats from cod liver and fish oil. People Need Fish Fats In times past, humans consumed a balance of omega-3 fats (found in fish, fish oils, walnuts, eggs, flaxseed meal, grass-fed meats) and omega-6 fats (found principally in vegetables and, more recently, in vegetable oils like corn, sunflower, safflower, and soy...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Stephanie Briggs

Chromium is a mineral that is essential to human health. In its trivalent form (meaning that it can bond with three other atoms)—the only form found in food and supplements—chromium appears to be among the safest of nutrients. The hexavalent form—hexa means six—is toxic, but it is not a nutrient and is not encountered in food. Chromium plays a role in the body’s use of energy-providing carbohydrates, protein and fat and, when in short supply, is associated with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes-like symptoms.[1] In 1977, the first published case of a chromium-diabetes link showed that the severe diabetic symptoms...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Research published in the December 2003 issue of Diabetes Care found that just half a teaspoon of cinnamon a day can significantly reduce blood sugar levels in diabetics. While evaluating the blood sugar effects from apple pie, Dr. Anderson and his team of researchers noticed it had the opposite effect of that expected, and the cinnamon was the culprit. The research team then asked volunteers with type 2 diabetes to take 1, 3, or 6 grams of cinnamon powder a day, in capsules after meals. Within weeks, the cinnamon-consumers’ blood sugar levels averaged 20% lower than a control group. Some...

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