Bone Health

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Calcium Absorption

Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Individual Calcium Needs When it comes to calcium, many people believe if a little bit is good, more must be better. But, what if it is really an issue of absorption and preventing calcium loss, rather than consuming more and...



Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

Amazing Vitamin K

For many years, vitamin K was pretty much the Rodney Dangerfield of vitamins. It just didn’t get any respect. Most doctors and dietitians figured the body didn’t need much vitamin K. After all, the official government recommendation is for a scant 90 mcg daily. And its only biological role seemed to be in promoting blood clotting. But recent research has shown broad and impressive health benefits from vitamin K supplements in strengthening bones, preventing and reversing osteoporosis, reducing the risk of diabetes, lowering the risk of some types of heart disease, and possibly preventing cancer. Vitamin K is turning out...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

A Harbinger of Overall Health: Nutrient deficiencies that cause osteoporosis may predict your risk for other diseases

Your bones aren’t just a bunch of calcium-rich rocks. They’re living, dynamic tissue—highly mineralized, yes, but also very much dependent on a wide range of nutrients to maintain their strength, density, and flexibility throughout life. And the nutrient deficiencies that predispose a person to osteoporosis can also set the stage for many other health problems, including heart disease, cancer, and muscle spasms, to mention just a few. Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone density and deterioration of bone tissue, may also be a predictor of other serious health issues that may crop up down the road. The same nutrients that are needed for healthy bones...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Lindsay Wilson

The Important Mineral You’re Probably Not Getting Enough Of

Magnesium in Food | Magnesium Supplements You know your body depends on a number of vitamins to properly function, but did you know that certain minerals are also vital for health? Minerals are found throughout the body and work with vitamins, enzymes, and hormones to regulate a myriad of biological functions. Calcium is one mineral that tends to steal the spotlight, but magnesium is just as important, if not more important, when it comes to whole body health. And while many people focus on their calcium intake, they forget about magnesium. Can one simple mineral be that important for health? In...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

Osteoporosis Risk: A Harbinger of Overall Health

Nutrient deficiencies that cause osteoporosis may predict your risk for other diseases Your bones aren’t just a bunch of calcium-rich rocks. They’re living, dynamic tissue—highly mineralized, yes, but also very much dependent on a wide range of nutrients to maintain their strength, density, and flexibility throughout life. And the nutrient deficiencies that predispose a person to osteoporosis can also set the stage for many other health problems, including heart disease, cancer, and muscle spasms, to mention just a few. Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone density and deterioration of bone tissue, may also be a predictor of other serious...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Lindsay Wilson

A Power Duo for Health

Vitamins K and D may not be the most glamorous of supplements, but they are two of the most important when it comes to supporting overall health, particularly bone and cardiovascular health. They share a unique (and significant) partnership and are a must in everyone’s daily supplement routine. Vitamins K and D are fat-soluble vitamins, meaning they dissolve in fat and are stored in the liver and fatty tissue (other fat-soluble vitamins include A and E). Most of us do not get an adequate supply of these vitamins from food, thus it is important to supplement. Vitamins K and D...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO

Fosamax® Needs a Break

“Take a break to prevent a break” might become a safety slogan for the drugs that have been used with apparent success to treat osteoporosis. Alendronate, the drug we know as Fosamax® may actually weaken bone and lead to increased fracture risk. Alendronate belongs to a class of drugs called bisphosphonates. These chemicals were developed in the 19th century but were not investigated until the 1960s for use in disorders of bone metabolism. Their non-medical use was to soften water in irrigation systems used in orange groves. The rationale for giving them to people was that they prevented the dissolution...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Lindsay Wilson

Bone Health 101: Beyond Calcium

You know it’s important to have strong bones, but do you know how to build and maintain them? Sorry, your morning glass of milk doesn’t count. Furthermore, do you know the lifestyle, medical, and dietary factors that may weaken your bones? Unfortunately, many people don’t know the answer to either of these questions, which may account for the large number of Americans who have osteoporosis, which is characterized by low bone density and deterioration of bone tissue. According to the National Institutes of Health, around 10 million Americans (80 percent are women) have osteoporosis, a condition where bones become weak...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Heather Isely

Ipriflavone is a synthetic isoflavone. Ipriflavone’s dubious classification as a natural compound invites regulatory agencies to investigate the compound. To date, no studies have convincingly demonstrated that ipriflavone occurs in nature. All published biomedical literature refers to ipriflavone as a synthetic isoflavone. In 1 969 a research project aimed at synthesizing isoflavone derivatives that could exhibit anabolic but not estrogenic activity was started. About 200 new molecules were prepared and screened. Among them, based on the result of several different experimental tests ipriflavone was selected in 1970. In particular, the investigators’ attention focused on the calcium-retaining effect shown by it...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Lisa Schofield

Feel It In Your Bones!

Did you know that your body contains approximately 2.5 pounds of calcium (also known as microcrystalline hydroxyapatite) and that 99 percent of those 2.5 pounds is stored in your bones and teeth? One would therefore correctly believe that calcium is essential in the diet - or through supplementation if one's diet is rather lacking. Meanwhile, write Shari Lieberman, Ph.D. and Nancy Bruning in The Real Vitamin and Mineral Book, the remaining one per-cent of calcium is spread throughout the body in the bloodstream and the fluids surrounding the cells. This circulating calcium, points out Ann Louise Gittleman in her book,...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Heather Pratt, MNT, BCHN

The bioavailability of calcium and magnesium from foods varies from food source to food source. While foods such as grains and legumes are often touted as being high in minerals like calcium and magnesium, the minerals in these foods is tightly bound to compounds called phytates that actually inhibit absorption. Grains and legumes can be problematic for many additional reasons and many people will experience greater health benefits by avoiding them in general. Certain leafy green vegetables, nuts and seeds, contain oxalates that also bind minerals. To maximize absorption of calcium and magnesium from these foods, favor cooked leafy green...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO

Hillel, a famous rabbi who lived in Jerusalem during the time of King Herod, was asked if he could summarize the Torah while standing on one foot. His famous reply that he made on one foot was,"That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation. Now go and learn." (Talmud: Shabbat 31a.) This article is not about Hillel’s ‘golden rule’ but rather on his method of standing. “Unipedal Standing” is the scientific term for standing on one foot.  Daily minute long intervals may be a useful intervention to...

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