Celiac/Gluten Sensitivity

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Allergies and Pollen

Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

Ahhh-choo! Yes, it’s that time again—flowers blooming, bees buzzing and lots of sneezing—the all-too-familiar sights and sounds of spring. If you have pollen allergies, spring and summer can be miserable times. You can suffer with itchy eyes, a runny nose,...



Posted 01/01/70

Possible Sources of Gluten in Packaged Foods

Barley Caramel Color (rarely contains gluten in the US) Colorings Dextrin Enriched Flour Flour Wheat Flour Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein or Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein Malt Flavoring or Malt Syrup Modified Food Starch Mono/diglycerides MSG (foreign sources may contain gluten) Natural Flavorings (under new labeling policy, natural flavorings will say “contains barley”) Oats Rice syrup (contains barley enzymes) Rye Spices Soy Sauce Stabilizers Starch Vinegar (is sometimes made from wheat; distillation should remove any gluten*) Vanilla and vanilla extract (may be grain alcohol based, but most are from corn. Distillation should remove any gluten*) Whisky, Gin (distillation generally makes these products safe...

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Posted 01/01/70

Gluten 101

What is gluten? Gluten is a collection of proteins (namely the long amino-acid chains gliadins and glutenins) that make bread rise and give the delectable texture to so many processed and baked foods. Wheat contains the most gluten, and the closer a grain is in relation to wheat, the greater its ability to cause trouble.2 This includes rye, barley, triticale (a wheat-rye hybrid), and oats. On the other hand, rice and corn are further removed from wheat and do not cause problems for those sensitive to gluten.1,2 Other gluten-free grains and flours include sorghum (millet-like grain), amaranth, quinoa, almond, arrowroot,...

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Posted 01/01/70

Most Americans eat grains every day, at every meal. Grains are the backbone of the modern diet and the foundation of the USDA’s food pyramid, yet grains may not support optimal health. Grains tend to displace more nutrient-dense foods like vegetables and fruits in the diet and you may be surprised to find out that they can have adverse effects on blood sugar and hormone levels, leading to weight gain. In addition, all grains contain a variety of compounds that can damage the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, initiate an immune response and promote inflammation.   Identifying Grains The term...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Heather Pratt, MNT, BCHN

A Glimpse Into the World of Grain-Free Baking: Discover new flours for making this holiday delicious AND healthy

Flour. Where would we be without it? We use it to bread our meats, thicken our sauces, bake our cookies, and otherwise fill our bellies, but most of us have a love-hate relationship with flour. We love the taste and texture it gives the foods we hold dear, but we hate what it does to our waistlines… and our complexions, our joints, our GI tracts, our arteries, and our brains.[1][2] Consuming flour can negatively affect the whole body, and we can’t sneak around this unfortunate truth by hiding behind a bag of whole grain flour. Flour milled from grain (whole...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Simple Elimination Diet Information

The purpose of an elimination diet is to discover symptom-triggering foods. Everyone’s body responds to foods differently. If we are sensitive to a food, there are a host of symptoms our body can respond with, such as headaches, skin rashes, joint pains, and digestive problems, just to name a few. Begin by eliminating foods you think may be the source of your symptoms. If you are unsure, start with the foods that most commonly cause a reaction, these include: Dairy products* (lactose and casein) Wheat* (and other gluten-containing foods) Eggs (whites particularly) Corn Peanuts Tomatoes Shellfish All citrus fruits and...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Stephanie Briggs

Celiac disease (CD) is a hereditary autoimmune response to the gluten proteins found in wheat, spelt, kamut, rye, triticale, barley, and perhaps oats. This means that when a person with celiac disease eats a gluten-containing food, the person’s immune system mistakes the gluten proteins as foreign invaders and produces an inflammatory response in the small intestine. The inflammation causes the intestinal villi (the finger-like projections responsible for nutrient absorption) to become flattened, greatly reducing absorption of nutrients from foods. A multitude of health problems can result. Celiac disease is also called sprue, non-tropical sprue, and gluten sensitive enteropathy. Individuals with...

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Posted 01/01/70

The Fruit of Life

Long prized by the indigenous people of Brazil’s Northern Amazon, the Açai berry (pronounced AH-SIGH-EE) is only now being validated by modern science as a remarkable fruit. Known to Brazilians as the fruit of the “Tree of Life,” açai is a tasty nutritional powerhouse with twice the antioxidants of blueberries, ten times that of grapes and cranberries, and up to 30 times the anthocyanins of red wine. Research has shown that in addition to anthocyanins and essential fatty acids, this fruit contains a healthy dose of plant sterols, which have been shown to reduce cholesterol, protect the immune system, and...

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