Skin Health

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Skin Health and the Sun

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There is a general consensus out there that if you spend more than 10 minutes in the sun, you should apply sunscreen to protect yourself from UV-induced damage, including skin cancer. Unfortunately, it is not that simple. First, sunscreen use...



Posted 01/01/70

Dietary fiber generally refers to parts of whole grains, legumes, nuts, vegetables, and fruits that cannot be digested by humans. There are two different types of dietary fiber, insoluble and soluble. Most foods contain both types of fibers, with one type predominating over the other. Insoluble fiber includes cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water. This type of fiber acts like a broom that sweeps through the colon. It aids digestion, aids elimination, promotes regularity, and contributes to bowel cleansing. Soluble fiber, on the other hand, includes pectin, guar gum, mucilages, and algal polysaccharides. Soluble fiber...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

Protect Yourself Against the “Chemical Soup”

Reduce your exposures, enhance your body’s defenses   We live in a chemical soup, made up of some 80,000 chemicals, most of which did not exist 70 years ago.[i] Many of them end up in our food, our water, our homes, the air we breathe, and ultimately, our bodies. New homes and furniture release formaldehyde, a recognized carcinogen, from carpeting, vinyl flooring, and particleboard. Electronics, cars, and mattresses are treated with chemical fire retardants. In many parts of the country, homes and soil must be treated for insect pests, such as termites—more chemicals that we breathe in. And if your...

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Posted 01/01/70

Protecting Your Skin from UV Damage: Topical Solutions

Lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene, and astaxanthin belong to a group of nutrients called carotenoids. Carotenoids are a group of naturally occurring pigments that are largely responsible for the red, yellow, and orange color of fruits and vegetables and some animals. They are also found in many dark green vegetables; however the large amounts of chlorophyll in these plants masks them. The natural carotenoid pigments carry out a variety of important biological functions. In humans, carotenoids function as antioxidants, stimulate cell to cell communication, are involved in cell growth, play a role in the immune system and some are converted by the...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Lindsay Wilson

BPA and Your Health

You have probably heard of BPA, or bisphenol A, a chemical used in the production of certain plastics and epoxy resins that are widely used in the food packaging industry. If you have heard of BPA, then you most likely have heard of the negative health effects this chemical can have on human health. Unfortunately, it is hard to avoid this ubiquitous chemical—it is estimated that more than seven billion pounds of BPA is produced each year[1] and it is found in everything from municipal water pipes, water bottles and baby bottles to plastic flatware and the plastic work bowls...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Going Green for Great Vitality: Nutrient-Concentrated Green Foods

There’s no question green foods are essential for achieving good health. Just looking at kale, seaweed, and broccoli, it’s obvious they are loaded with life-giving nutrients. The real challenge is actually eating them on a regular basis. Luckily, concentrated nutrition in green food supplements is right at your fingertips. There are a number of different options - chlorophyll, algae, young grasses, and green food combinations.1 Their extravaganza of nutrients includes vitamins, minerals, enzymes, phytochemicals, and antioxidants, which rightly bestows them the name of “superfoods.” These food supplements can encourage health in innumerable ways, including detoxification support, combating destructive free radicals...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Stephanie Briggs

Other β-glucans, such as those in oats and barley, lower serum cholesterol and regulate blood glucose. There are many different β-glucans. Cellulose is a β-glucan, but it does not possess immune-modulating activity. For a β-glucan to function as an immune modulator, it must have a backbone chain of glucose molecules in 1→3 linkage plus branch chains attached to the backbone in 1→6 linkage. Such molecules are often referred to as 1,3/1,6 β-glucans. (Cellulose has the 1→3 linkages but no branches.) A 1,3/1,6 β-glucan has a shape that fits onto receptors on the surface of certain white blood cells and activates...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Astaxanthin (as' tä zan' thin) is the main carotenoid pigment found in aquatic animals – particularly in krill, shrimps and salmonid fish. This red-orange pigment is closely related to other well-known carotenoids such as beta-carotene or lutein but has been found to have a stronger antioxidant activity (10 times higher than beta-carotene). Studies suggest that astaxanthin can be 500 to 1000 times more effective as an antioxidant than vitamin E.[1] In many of the aquatic animals where it can be found, astaxanthin has a number of essential biological functions, ranging from protection against oxidation of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids, protection...

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