Digestive Health

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Leaky Gut

Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

The immune system is as remarkable as it is complex. It is, after all, our body’s 24/7 watchdog. When the immune system functions normally, it distinguishes external foes from friends—mounting a powerful response to infections while allowing nourishing nutrients to...



Posted 01/01/70

Dietary fiber generally refers to parts of whole grains, legumes, nuts, vegetables, and fruits that cannot be digested by humans. There are two different types of dietary fiber, insoluble and soluble. Most foods contain both types of fibers, with one type predominating over the other. Insoluble fiber includes cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water. This type of fiber acts like a broom that sweeps through the colon. It aids digestion, aids elimination, promotes regularity, and contributes to bowel cleansing. Soluble fiber, on the other hand, includes pectin, guar gum, mucilages, and algal polysaccharides. Soluble fiber...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Decker Weiss NMD AACVPR

Safe, Natural, Effective Cleansing

Hair spray. Lawn fertilizers. Food preservatives. Dry cleaning. Flea repellent on our pets. We depend on these products to keep our hair stylish, our grass green, our food fresh, our clothes clean, and our pets healthy. However, the creation of these and thousands of other products are exposing us to more chemicals and toxins than ever before. And the presence of these harmful substances is becoming increasingly widespread. According to organizations devoted to protecting the environment, including the Sierra Club, the Izaak Walton League, and even the Environmental Protection Agency, we are exposed to literally tens of thousands of chemicals and contaminants every day. All across America, from...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Stephanie Briggs

Stomach acid – hydrochloric acid or HCL – is essential for good digestion. It promotes the breakdown of proteins, it’s essential for optimal absorption of certain minerals, and it forms a barrier against bacterial and fungal pathogens that might otherwise enter the intestine through the nose or mouth. Absence of stomach acid (achlorhydria) or too little stomach acid (hypochlorhydria) results in nutrient deficiencies and imbalances in the intestinal microflora, which can lead to a host of serious disorders. Conditions associated with low stomach acid include the following: (Note: These conditions can also result from other causes.) Anemia, iron deficiency Asthma...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

Stop the Burn: Natural ways to help with acid reflux and GERD

Heartburn has long plagued mankind. Three thousand years ago, the ancient Sumerians of Mesopotamia even had a word to describe it. Yes, ancient civilizations suffered from heartburn, too. Heartburn, or acid reflux, is an all too common condition caused when stomach acid regurgitates, or backs up, into the esophagus.[i] These days 20 percent of people in the U.S. suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), severe or chronic acid reflux that can have more serious implications. Almost everyone experiences heartburn at one time or another. However, people who are overweight have a higher risk of experiencing GERD, and that risk increases...

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Posted 01/01/70

Even though aloe looks like a cactus, it is actually a member of the Lily family, the same family that garlic and onions belong to. Believed to have originated in Africa, it quickly spread, and today over 300 different species are grown around the world. Of all these varieties, Aloe vera is probably the best recognized. The use of aloe goes back as far as the 4th century B.C.E. Early Egyptians, Persians, Greeks, Indians and Africans left records of its use, which mostly focused on topical ailments such as burns, lacerations, dermatitis and leprosy. Later, it was also used internally...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Heather Pratt, MNT, BCHN

Put Your Food to the Fire: Eating cooked food is one of the driving forces that made us human

“Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth has offered us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.” - Harold McGee from On Food and Cooking   Broiled, boiled, baked, sautéed or fried, cooked food (and cooking that food) likely forms an integral part of your daily diet, and is probably deeply ingrained in your traditions, memories, and maybe even your social life. Despite this, if you ask most Americans what is healthier—a cooked carrot or a raw one—most will likely say the raw carrot. Cooking is often...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Lindsay Wilson

Glutamine, a Most Versatile Amino Acid: This “non-essential” amino acid is actually quite essential for health

You probably don’t think a well-conditioned athlete and a seriously ill person have much in common. Well, maybe they don’t. But there is a supplement that can benefit them both. It can also benefit those who are undergoing surgery, are suffering from a serious injury or major muscle loss, are chronically stressed, or whose gut needs extra support. The supplement is the amino acid glutamine and it is proving itself to be very versatile for a broad range of health issues. Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in the body and is involved in more metabolic processes than any...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Dietary Recommendations for Candidiasis

Candidiasis or yeast syndrome is an infection caused by an overgrowth in the gastrointestinal tract of the usually benign yeast (or fungus) Candida albicans.[i],[ii] Normally, Candida albicans lives harmoniously in the inner warm creases and crevices of the digestive tract and vaginal tract in women.[iii] The immune system usually keeps candida proliferation under control, but when the immune response is weakened, candida growth can proceed unhindered. Candida is an "opportunistic organism" which, when given the opportunity, will attempt to colonize all bodily tissues. The uncontrolled growth of candida is known as candida overgrowth. In small amounts, this fungus is harmless....

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Health Benefits of Butter

For centuries, many cultures around the globe have valued butter for its life-sustaining properties. A dentist-turned-researcher, Weston A. Price, studied native diets in the 1930s and found that butter was a staple for many vibrantly healthy peoples.[1] The groups he studied particularly valued the deep yellow butter produced by cows feeding on rapidly-growing green grass. It wasn’t until the beginning of the 1950s that the food industry began to turn liquid vegetables oils into solid fats with a process called hydrogenation, to supply the budding fast food and snack food industries. Hydrogenation turns oils (like soy, corn, or cottonseed) into...

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