Energy

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Energy

Author

Tracy Scheig, RD

Fatigue is multifaceted, thus has many contributing causes. Modem medicine focuses on finding a single cause of an ailment. This leads many people to thinking their fatigue and low energy is easily treatable with a specific drug, nutrient, remedy or...



Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

Prime Your Body’s Cells for Optimal Energy

Tired? Run down? Burned out? Worn out? Exhausted?  One of every four people admits to feeling tired much of the time. And a recent survey, conducted by the Hartman Group, which tracks consumer trends, found that one-third of Americans say they have less energy today compared with a year ago. Not surprisingly, fatigue is the most common complaint physicians hear from their patients. There are a great many reasons why so many people feel tired. Sometimes it’s a lack of restful sleep. Other times we just push ourselves too hard at home and work. Poor eating habits play a big...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Heather Pratt, MNT, BCHN

Gifts from the Hive: Where would we be without the honeybee?

The gifts of the honeybee are many. Through their tireless work of gathering nectar and pollen and caring for the hive and its inhabitants, bees enhance our health through the products they create and as the world’s most valuable pollinators. You may not think of fruits, vegetables, and nuts and seeds as the product of bees, but you should—bees are an integral part of today’s food industry, and through pollination, are responsible for bringing many healthy and delicious foods to your table. Bees work in synergy with flowering plants: as they gather the nectar and pollen they need to feed...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Carnitine can be found in food and is also synthesized in the body in the brain, liver, and kidneys, but only if necessary substances are available. Carnitine is predominately found in meat and animal products. In general, the redder the meat, the higher the carnitine content.[1] Mutton and lamb have the highest levels, while chicken and turkey contain much less. Milk and dairy then follow in carnitine content, and grains, fruits, and vegetables have almost none.[2] For the body to synthesize carnitine, certain substances are required, namely, the two essential amino acids lysine and methionine (essential meaning they must come...

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