Heart Health

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Citrus Bioflavonoids

Author

Stephanie Briggs

Flavonoids (or bioflavonoids) are a class of phytonutrients (i.e., nutrients produced by plants) grouped together because of their basic molecular structure. There are many points of attachment to that basic structure and many possibilities for what may be attached at...



Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

What do hemorrhoids and varicose veins have in common with heart attack and stroke? More than you might think. From the annoying to the severe, these health conditions are all related to dysfunction in the vascular system. Think of the vascular system as your body’s lifeline—it is the vast system of arteries, veins, and capillaries that carries blood throughout the body, delivering life-giving oxygen and nutrients to tissues and organs, while removing waste. The health of every body system depends on a healthy vascular system—respiratory health, gut health, brain health, kidney and urinary health, and cardiovascular health. When blood vessels...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Heather Pratt, MNT, BCHN

Garlic is probably the best researched and most commonly used herb in the world. Native to Central Asia, garlic is now used in most every country’s cuisine. Mention of garlic can be found in the ancient medical texts of Egypt, India, China, Greece, and Rome, some dating as far back as 5,000 years. This world-renowned cure-all herb has been touted for everything from weight loss and infections to low energy, dysentery, snake bites and low libido.[1] A search through the research literature of today yields over 4,000 citations on garlic, suggesting it is just as popular in modern times as...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Heather Pratt, MNT, BCHN

Foods to Support Your Best Cardiovascular Health

February is American Heart Month, and while you’ll no doubt see and hear a lot about the heart this month,it is but one pieceof the whole picture of cardiovascular health. Of equal importance is the intricate system of arteries, veins, and capillaries—collectively called the blood vessels—thatput the vascular in cardiovascular. The blood vessels are more than just inactive tubes for transporting the blood pumped by the heart; they play a crucial role in overall cardiovascular health, actively impacting blood pressure, blood viscosity, as well as the formation of plaque.The vascular system, and thus overall cardiovascular health, is very sensitive to...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Heather Pratt, MNT, BCHN

February is American Heart Month, and while you’ll no doubt see and hear a lot about the heart this month,it is but one pieceof the whole picture of cardiovascular health. Of equal importance is the intricate system of arteries, veins, and capillaries—collectively called the blood vessels—thatput the vascular in cardiovascular. The blood vessels are more than just inactive tubes for transporting the blood pumped by the heart; they play a crucial role in overall cardiovascular health, actively impacting blood pressure, blood viscosity, as well as the formation of plaque.The vascular system, and thus overall cardiovascular health, is very sensitive to...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

Beyond the Heart: The Bigger Picture of Vascular Diseases

When we talk about cardiovascular disease, we tend to focus on the heart and heart disease, but the typical adult body contains some 100,000 miles of blood vessels.[1] Just as accidents are bound to occur over that many miles of highway, problems can develop in the arteries and veins far from your heart. While the heart pumps blood, a subtle dilation and contraction of blood vessels, along with a series of tiny valves, helps move that blood through arteries and veins. The flow of blood is regulated in large part by the endothelium, a thin layer of cells that line...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Julie Olson, C.N.

Bilberries Are Berry Beneficial to Vascular Health

The vascular system, also known as the circulatory system, is made up of the vessels that carry blood and lymph through the body from the brain down to the toes, delivering oxygen and nutrients to tissues and organs and removing waste products. In addition to circulating blood and lymph through the body, the vascular system also plays a major role in the proper functioning of other body systems, including the respiratory, nervous, digestive, and urinary systems – a properly functioning vascular system is crucial for whole body health. And an unassuming little berry known as the bilberry has a special...

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Posted 01/01/70

Hawthorn is the common name given to plants belonging to the genus Crataegus, with many different species found throughout temperate zones stretching from North America to Asia. It belongs to the Rose family and is a small tree with rose-like flowers and brown to red berry-like fruits. It has a long history of use, especially in Europe, where it is still widely used to support the health of the cardiovascular system. The flowers, leaves and fruit are all used in modern herbal preparations of hawthorn. Although traditional uses vary somewhat (including as a digestive aid in Chinese medicine), nearly all...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jacob Schor, ND, FABNO

Vitamin D vs Lowering Cholesterol to Prevent Heart Failure

It is not unusual for me to hear from patients that they are thrilled to see their total cholesterol, or that of their loved ones go down. Apparently, not only are some of my patients thrilled, but apparently the MD's are thrilled as well. The only one unimpressed is me. I want to say "Big Deal", but with sarcasm. Decreasing one's cholesterol levels has ridiculously little effect on health. One certainly won't feel any better. Though many people consider it miraculous that some herbal mix will lower their cholesterol from 225 to below 200, it's not a big deal. Overall...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Nutrients to Keep Your Ticker in Tip Top Shape

It may surprise you to learn that many risk factors traditionally thought to be predictive of heart disease are not holding up with current research. A report from the American Journal of Critical Care found that 50% of the patients with coronary artery disease do not have any of the traditional risk factors.1 For example, it is now understood that C-reactive protein, a measure of overall body inflammation, is more indicative of someone’s risk of heart disease than cholesterol. In fact, most people (over 80%) who experience a heart attack do not have elevated cholesterol levels.2 Focusing on what we now know...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

It has been estimated that 40% of heart attacks and strokes in the US may be the result of elevated levels of homocysteine in the blood. Homocysteine is naturally produced in the body as a normal by-product of methionine (an essential amino acid) breakdown. However, it is only supposed to exist for a brief time before the body converts it into other useful substances. Problems arise when the body accumulates too much of this by-product due to a diet that does not provide the nutrients necessary to metabolize it completely and/or encourages over-production of it. High homocysteine levels prevent the...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jack Challem, The Nutrition Reporter™

The Truth About Cholesterol

You could call the near-epidemic condition cholesterolphobia. Cholesterol, along with saturated fat, have for decades been the bogeymen of heart disease. But for most people, dietary cholesterol probably doesn’t matter. In fact, worrying about the amount of cholesterol in your diet is as absurd as fretting about drinking too much water. Why? Because cholesterol is essential for health. Cholesterol is a key building block of our steroid hormones, including estrogen and testosterone. Without cholesterol and steroid hormones, there would be no romance in the world, and you wouldn’t be able to have sex or make babies. You also need cholesterol...

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Posted 01/01/70
Author

Jen Allbritton, CN

Doctors frequently prescribe a daily aspirin as a preventative against heart attack. But, do you know the dangers of a regular intake of aspirin? Keep in mind, aspirin is a drug, and with drugs come side effects. If you or someone you love takes or is thinking about taking aspirin for heart attack prevention, there are a few questions you should ask. What is the function of aspirin in heart health? Do the benefits of aspirin outweigh the negative health consequences? Are there safer, natural choices to get the same result as aspirin? Aspirin and Its Functions Aspirin cuts the...

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