Vitamins & Supplements - Things We Won’t Carry and Why

Your health is our priority.

Unlike other retailers, when it comes to quality vitamins and supplements, we don’t just talk the talk—we research, take a fine-tooth comb to, and deliberate over each ingredient allowed in the supplements we carry on our shelves. We never take lightly the fact that you’ve trusted us with your health—and that’s why all the supplements we carry go through a rigorous screening process by our quality standards experts. If we won't take it, you won't find it here. In fact, what you won’t find on our shelves is as important as what you will find. We've put together a growing list of the most problematic supplement ingredients, many of which are still commonly found in supplements at other retailers and online—but never here.

 

Grandmothered & Limited Ingredients 

As new research becomes available, an ingredient that might not have been considered problematic may now be an ingredient of concern or unacceptable. Read more about grandmothered and limited ingredients.

Vitamin & Supplement Ingredients We Won’t Carry

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

Please see "DHEA" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Even though Active Agave™ has a better fructose to glucose ration than traditional agave, all agave is high processed.

Please see "Agave—Grandmothered & Limited" for more information. 

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

  • The sweetener agave is composed of 75% to 85% free fructose.[i] This is higher than the amount of fructose found in high fructose corn syrup which comes in at around 55% fructose. 
  • When fructose is absorbed, it goes directly to the liver where it is converted into fat (aka triglycerides).[ii] This translates into elevated blood triglycerides (a risk factor for cardiovascular disease), increased visceral fat, and, over time, increases the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).[iii] [iv] 
  • Unlike other carbohydrates, fructose does not suppress the production of the hunger hormone ghrelin but still stimulates reward in the brain which leads to excessive consumption.[v]
  • Agave syrup (aka nectar) is extracted, heat treated, enzyme treated, refined, clarified, demineralized, deodorized and concentrated.[vi] It is highly processed in a manner similar to the processes used for high fructose corn syrup and refined sugar.

 


[i] Willems J, Low N. Major carbohydrate, polyol, and oligosaccharide profiles of agave syrup. Application of this data to authenticity analysis. J Agric Food Chem. 2012; 3(60): 8745-8754

[ii] Bray GA. Fructose: Pure, White, and Deadly? Fructose, by Any Other Name, Is a Health Hazard. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2010; 4(4): 1003-1007

[iii] Teff, K. L., Elliott, S. S., Tschöp, M., Kieffer, T. J., Rader, D., Heiman, M., Townsend, R. R., Keim, N. L., D'Alessio, D., & Havel, P. J. (2004). Dietary fructose reduces circulating insulin and leptin, attenuates postprandial suppression of ghrelin, and increases triglycerides in women. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism89(6), 2963–2972. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2003-031855

[iv] Jegatheesan, P. De Bandt, J-P. (2017). Fructose and NAFLD: the multifaceted aspects of fructose metabolism. Nutrients, 9(3), 230. doi: 10.3390/nu9030230

[v] Teff, K. L., Elliott, S. S., Tschöp, M., Kieffer, T. J., Rader, D., Heiman, M., Townsend, R. R., Keim, N. L., D'Alessio, D., & Havel, P. J. (2004). Dietary fructose reduces circulating insulin and leptin, attenuates postprandial suppression of ghrelin, and increases triglycerides in women. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism89(6), 2963–2972. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2003-031855

[vi] Maldonado-Guevara, B.I., Mart ń del Campo, S.T., Cardador-Mart ńez, A. (2018). Production process effect on Mexican agave syrups quality: a preliminary study. J Food Res, 7(3), 50-57.  doi:10.5539/jfr.v7n3p50

Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information.

Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information.

  • Allulose is a rare sugar that only naturally occurs in a few foods in very small amounts. We do not know the impacts the commercially available, manmade version will have on human health and, in particular, the human microbiome, in larger amounts.
  • Commercially produced allulose is made through an enzymatic process with the starting materials of corn and sugar beets, both of which are commonly genetically modified. The enzymes used may also be produced from genetically modified microbes.[i] [ii]
  • Allulose is known to cause bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, and with increasing doses may also cause more extreme symptoms such as nausea, headache, and loss of appetite.[iii]

 


[i] Jiang, S., Xiao, W., Zhu, X., Yang, P., Zheng, Z., Lu, S., …Liu, J. (2020). Review on D-allulose: In vivo metabolism, catalytic mechanism, engineering strain construction, bio-production technology. Front Bioeng Biotechnol, 8, 26. doi: 10.3389/fbioe.2020.00026

[ii] Watson, E. (2009, May 13). Tate & Lyle: ‘The first two things consumers look for on the Nutrition Facts Panel now are calories and sugar’. Food Navigator USA website. Retrieved November 24, 2020 from https://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Article/2019/05/13/Tate-Lyle-talks-allulose-The-first-two-things-consumers-look-for-on-the-Nutrition-Facts-panel-now-are-calories-and-sugar#

[iii] Han, Y., Choi, B.R., Kim, S.Y., Bim, S-B., Kim, Y.H, Kwon, E-Y., Choi. M-S. (2018). Gastrointestinal tolerance of D-allulose in healthy young adults. A non-randomized controlled trial. Nutrients, 10(12), 2010. doi: 10.3390/nu10122010

Please see "Graviola (Annonna muricata)" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

  • We define artificial colors as any food coloring derived from a non-food source, usually coal tar or petroleum. 
  • The process of making artificial colors is extremely hazardous and can result in very dangerous chemicals in the final product. Due to this fact, the FDA requires batch certification to try and ensure there are minimal levels of dangerous chemicals in the final product. However, FDA batch-certified artificial colors may still contain upwards of 10 percent impurities and some of these impurities are known carcinogens.[i]
  • The adverse health effects linked to artificial colors currently approved for use in the United States include allergies, hyperactivity, cancer, nerve-cell toxicity, genotoxicity, and immune dysfunction.[ii]
  • A 2021 report by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, in conjunction with the California Environmental Protection Agency, found that human and animal studies confirm artificial colors have a negative effect on children’s behavior (causing inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and restlessness), and that some children seem to be especially susceptible to their effects. The report also states that the FDA’s current acceptable daily intake (ADI) level for artificial colors is too high to protect children from these adverse effects.[iii]

 


[i] Food Dyes - Center for Science in the Public Interest. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://cspinet.org/sites/default/files/attachment/food-dyes-rainbow-of-risks.pdf

[ii] Food Dyes - Center for Science in the Public Interest. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://cspinet.org/sites/default/files/attachment/food-dyes-rainbow-of-risks.pdf

[iii] Children’s Environmental Health Center, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency. (2021, Apr). Potential neurobehavior effects of synthetic food dyes in children. Retrieved from: https://oehha.ca.gov/risk-assessment/press-release/report-links-synthetic-food-dyes-hyperactivity-and-other

  • Artificial fats do not occur naturally and are not able to be digested by the human body. They are used in highly processed junk food to give the illusion of being “healthier.” Reducing the fat and calorie content of junk food does not make it healthy.
  • Ingestion of artificial fats depletes fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, and carotenoids, including beta-carotene, lycopene, and lutein.[i]
  • These unnatural fats can cause extremely uncomfortable gastrointestinal issues.[ii]

 


[i] Schlagheck, T.G., Riccardi, K.A., Zorich, N.L., Torri, S.A., Dugan, L.D., Peters, J.C. (1997). Olestra dose response on fat-soluble and water soluble nutrients in humans. J Nutr, 127(8 Suppl), 1646S-1665S. DOI: 10.1093/jn/127.8.1646S

[ii] Jacobson, M. F. (2004, October 21). Re: Docket No 87F-0179 [Letter to Lester Crawford, U.S. Food and Drug Administration]. Center for Science in the Public Interest, Washington D.C.. Retrieved from https://www.cspinet.org/sites/default/files/attachment/9th_report_letter.pdf

  • Artificial flavors are made from synthetic man-made chemicals mostly derived from petrochemical raw materials. Artificial flavor production can also be very detrimental to the environment.[i]
  • The safety of artificial flavors is still questionable. In the 1950s, new requirements for food chemicals were imposed, but because there were so many flavors and flavor additives already in use at that time, the FDA simply exempted them from testing requirements, essentially grandfathering them in as safe. Most new flavor chemicals are approved by an expert panel assembled by the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association, funded by the flavor industry.[ii]
  • Many artificial flavors are combinations of many chemicals, and many contain more adjuvants, such as emulsifiers, solvents, preservatives, and flavor modifiers, than flavoring.[iii]

 


[i] Maeda, M. Hooya, T., Yoshioka, K., Miyafuji, H. Ohno, H, Yamada, T. (2018). Vanillin production from native softwood lignin in the presence of tetrabutylammonium ion. J Wood Sci, 64, 810-815. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10086-018-1766-0

[ii] Berenstein, N. (Nov 23, 2015). The inexorable rise of synthetic flavor: a pictorial history. Popular Science website. Retrieved 11/05/20 from https://www.popsci.com/history-flavors-us-pictorial/

[iii] Hallagan, J.B., Hall, R.L. (2009). Under the conditions of intended use – new developments in the FEMA GRAS program and the safety assessment of flavor ingredients. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 47(2), 267-278. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2008.11.011

  • Artificial sweeteners are chemically produced sugar substitutes that are not found in nature.
  • Heavy consumption of artificial sweeteners is associated with a greater risk of being overweight and of having metabolic syndrome, an increased risk of developing cancer (even when consumed within the FDA’s established Acceptable Daily Intake), and cognitive impairment. [i] [ii] [iii] [iv] [v] [vi] [vii] [viii] [ix] [x] [xi] [xii] [xiii] Artificial sweeteners also alter the microbiota of the human gut, decreasing beneficial bacteria and increasing bacteria associated with inflammation. [xiv] [xv] [xvi]

Their safety is still highly questionable. Nearly all of the research that has shown them to be “safe” has been performed by the artificial sweetener industry, while independent, non-industry sponsored research has consistently found safety concerns.[xvii] [xviii]

 


[i] Fowler, S.P., Williams, K., Resendez, R.G., Hunt, K.J., Hazuda, H.P., Stern, M.P. (2012). Fueling the obesity epidemic? Artificially sweetened beverage use and long-term weight gain. Obesity, 16:1894-1900. DOI: 10.1038/oby.2008.284

[ii] Hess, E.L., Myers, E.A., Swithers, S.E., Hendrick,V.E. (2018). Associations between nonnutritive sweetener intake and metabolic syndrome in adults. J Am Coll Nutr, 37(6), 487-493.  doi: 10.1080/07315724.2018.1440658

[iii] Dhingra, R., Sullivan, L., Jacques, P.F., Wang, T.J., Fox C.S., Meigs, J.B.,…Vasan, R.S. (2007). Soft drink consumption and risk of developing cardiometabolic risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in middle-aged adults in the community. Circulation, 116, 480-488. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.689935

[iv] Lutsey, P.L., Steffen, L.M., Stevens, J. (2008). Dietary intake and the development of the metabolic syndrome. Circulation, 117,754-761. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.716159 

[v] Schernhammer, E.S., Bertrand, K.A., Birmann, B.M., Sampson, L., Willet, W.C., Feskanich, D. 2012). Consumption of artificial sweetener- and sugar-containing soda and risk of lymphoma and leukemia in men and women. Am J Clin Nutr, 96(6), 1419-1428.  doi: 10.3945/ajcn.111.030833

[vi] Andreatta, M.M., Muñoz, S.E., Latieri, M.J., Eynard, A.R., Navarro, A. (2008). Artificial sweetener consumption and urinary tract tumors in Cordoba, Argentina. Preventative Medicine, 47(1), 136-139. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.03.015

[vii] Sturgeon, S.R., Hartge, P., Silverman, D.T., Kantor, A.F., Linehan, W.M., Lynch, C., Hoover, R.N. (1994). Associations between bladder cancer risk factors and tumor stage and grade at diagnosis. Epidemiology, 5(2), 218-225. DOI:10.1097/00001648-199403000-00012

[viii] Abd El-Samad, A.A. (2010). Light and electron microscopic study on the cerebellar cortex of male albino rat. Egyp J Histol, 33(3), 419-430. DOI: Retrieved from https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6465/68d84a55f1ba03530cd577fd7c82b47c1e23.pdf 

[ix] Soffritti, M., Belpoggi, F., Esposti, D.D., Lambertini, L. (2005). Aspartame induces lymphomas and leukaemias in rats. European Journal of Oncology, 10(2), 107-116. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/225029050_Aspartame_induces_lymphomas_and_leukaemias_in_rats

[x] Soffritti, M., Belpoggi, F., Degli Esposti, D., Lambertinin, L., Tibaldi, E., Rigano, A. (2006). First experimental demonstration of the multipotential carcinogenic effects of aspartame administered in the feed to Sprague-Dawley rats. Environ Health Perspect, 114(3), 379-385. doi: 10.1289/ehp.8711

[xi] Romo-Romo, A., Aguilar-Salinas, C.A., Brito-Córdova, G.X., Gómez-Díaz, R.A., Almeda-Valdes, P. (2018). Sucralose decreases insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr, 108(3), 485-491. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqy152

[xii] Abu-Taweel, G.M., Zyadah, M.A., Ajarem, J.S., Ahmad, M. (2014). Cognitive and biochemical effects of monosodium glutamate and aspartame, administered individually and in combination in male albino mice. Neurotoxicity and Teratology, 42 (2014), 60-67. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ntt.2014.02.001  

[xiii] Lindseth, G.N., Coolahan, S.E., Petros, T.V., Lindseth, P.D. (2014). Neurobehavioral effects of aspartame consumption. Res Nurs Health, 37(3), 185-193. doi: 10.1002/nur.21595

[xiv] Bian, X., Tu, P., Chi, L., Gao, B., Ru, H., Lu, K. (2017). Saccharin induced liver inflammation in mice by altering the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions. Food and chemical Toxicology, 107, 530-539. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2017.04.045

[xv] Chi, L., Bian, X., Gao, B., Tu, P., Lai, Y., Ru, H., Lu, K. (2018). Effects of the artificial sweetener neotame on the gut microbiota and fecal metabolites in mice. Molecules, 23(2), 367. doi: 10.3390/molecules23020367

[xvi] Schiffman, S.S., Nagle, H.T. (2019). Revisited: Assessing the in vivo data on low/no-calorie sweeteners and the gut microbiota. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 132, 110692. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2019.110692

[xvii] Mandrioli, D., Kearns, C.E., Bero, L.A. (2016). Relationship between research outcomes and risk of bias, study sponsorship, and author financial conflicts of interest in reviews of the effects of artificially sweetened beverages on weight outcome: a systematic review. PLoS One, 11(9), e0162198. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0162198

[xviii] Walton, R.G. (1999). Survey of aspartame studies: correlation to outcome and funding sources. Retrieved from http://www.lightenyourtoxicload.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Dr-Walton-survey-of-aspartame-studies.pdf

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Caffeine or stimulant herbs added to boost caffeine content or have a stimulant effect" for more information.

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information. 

More information coming soon.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

  • Caramel colors II, III, and IV are created by heat treating carbohydrates with a sulfite-containing compound, an ammonium-containing compound, or both.
  • Caramel colors III and IV may be contaminated with 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI), which has been shown in numerous animal studies to cause convulsions.[i]
  • Caramel colors II, III, and IV may be contaminated with several known cancer-causing compounds such as 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI), furan, and 2-methylimidazole.[ii] [iii] [iv]
  • Because manufacturers don’t have to specify on the label which class of caramel coloring they use, we ensure that any manufacturer using caramel color is using class I, the only caramel color that does not contain added sulfite or ammonia and is the only caramel color produced in normal cooking processes.[v]

 


[i] European Food Safety Authority. (2011). Scientific opinion on the re-evaluation of caramel colours (E 150 a, b, c, d) as food additives. EFSA Journal, 9(3), 2004. https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2011.2004

[ii] https://www.fda.gov/food/food-additives-petitions/questions-answers-about-4-mei

[iii] n.a. 4-Methylimidazole Monograph. International Agency for Research on Cancer. Retrieved January 4, 2020 from https://monographs.iarc.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/mono101-015.pdf

[iv] Group, E. (n.d.). EWG's food scores just took the work out of grocery shopping for me! Retrieved March 29, 2021, from https://www.ewg.org/foodscores/ingredients/16660CARAMELCOLOR

[v] European Food Safety Authority. (2011). Scientific opinion on the re-evaluation of caramel colours (E 150 a, b, c, d) as food additives. EFSA Journal, 9(3), 2004. https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2011.2004

  • Although the 2018 Farm Bill effectively legalized hemp (the source of CBD) by removing it from the Federal list of controlled substances, it did not, however, create a completely free system and there are still restrictions on its production and sale.
  • CBD regulatory power is shared between states and the federal government and we sell CBD only in states where the sale of CBD products has been established as legal.
  • Although we acknowledge that CBD could be beneficial for many, we will not offer it for sale in any state or city where the pathway to legal CBD sales has not been clearly established.

FDA certified color additives are generally identified by a letter prefix, the color, and then a number (e.g., FD&C Yellow #5). 

Please see "Artificial colors" for more information.

  • There have been sporadic reports of people developing hepatotoxicity (liver toxicity), in some cases requiring a liver transplant, after the ingestion of chaparral.[i] [ii]
  • Animal studies have found that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a major component of chaparral, can cause toxicity and kidney damage.[iii]  
  • Chaparral should only be taken internally under a physician’s supervision.

 


[i] Sheikh, N.M., Philen, R.M., Love, L.A. (1997). Chaparral-associated hepatotoxicity. Arch Intern Med, 157(8), 913-919.   

[ii] (2017). Chaparral. In LiverTox: Clinical and research information on drug-induced liver injury [internet]. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Bethesda, MD. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK548355/  

[iii] Institute of Medicine (US) and National Research Council Committee for the Framework for Evaluating the Safety of Dietary Supplements. (2005). Appendix J: Prototype focused monograph: Review of liver-related risks for chaparral. In Dietary Supplements: A Framework for Evaluating Safety. National Academies Press. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK216051/  

  • Chemically modified fats are fats that have had their chemical structure altered in the lab to produce a novel fat that is not found in nature.
  • Some chemically modified fats cause inflammation, negatively affect heart health, promote obesity and insulin resistance, and negatively affect brain function.[i] [ii] [iii] [iv] [v] Others cause cardiac lesions and heart cell degeneration, impaired fertility and behavioral impairment in offspring of rats fed high amounts, while still others have been linked to the production of carcinogenic and environmentally dangerous by-products.[vi] [vii] [viii] [ix]
  • Chemically modified fats are sometimes used by supplement manufacturers as a filler or to aid in processing. They increase the manufacturer’s bottom line at the expense of consumer health.
  • An exception has been made for conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) which is a naturally occurring trans-fat that has many health supporting benefits. The CLA that is found in supplements is made via the partial hydrogenation of sunflower oil and is identical to CLA found naturally occurring in grass-fed dairy products that has demonstrated health supportive benefits.

 


[i] Shining the Spotlight on Trans Fats. (2018, July 12). Retrieved June 20, 2019, from https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/fats-and-cholesterol/types-of-fat/transfats/

[ii] Afonso, M.S., Lavrado, M.S., Koike, M.K., Cintra, D.E., Ferreira, F.D., Nunes, V.S.,…Lottenberg, A.M. (2016). Dietary interesterified fat enriched with palmitic acid induces atherosclerosis by impairing macrophage cholesterol efflux and eliciting inflammation. J Nutr Biochem, 32, 91-100.  doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2016.01.005

[iii] Lavrado, M.S.F., Afonso, M.S., Cintra, D. E., Koike, M., Nunes, V.S., Demasi, M.,…Lottenberg, A.M. ( 2019). Interesterified fats induce deleterious effects on adipose tissue and liver in LDLr-LO mice. Nutrients, 11, 46. doi:10.3390/nu11020466

[iv] Ng, Y.T., Voon, P.T., Ng, T.K.W., Lee, V.K.M., Mat Sahri, M., Mohd Esa, N., …Ong, A.S.H. (2018). Interesterified palm olein (IEPalm) and interesterified stearic acid-rick fat blend (IEStear) have no adverse effects on insulin resistance: a randomized control trial. Nutrients, 10(8), pii. doi: 10.3390/nu10081112.

[v] D’avila L.F., Dias V.T., Vey, L.T., Milanesi, L.H., Roversi, K., Emanuelli, T., …Maurer, H.L. (2017). Toxicological aspects of interesterified fat: Brain damages in rats. Toxicology Letters, 276, 122-128. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2017.05.020

[vi] Bendig, P., Maier, L., Vetter, W. (2012). Brominated vegetable oil in soft drinks – an underrated source of human organobromine intake. Food Chemistry, 133(3), 678-682. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.01.058 

[vii] Vorhees, C.V., Butcher, R.E., Wootten, V., Brunner, R.L. (1983). Behavioral and reproductive effects of chronic developmental exposure to brominated vegetable oil in rats. Teratology, 28, 309-318. https://doi.org/10.1002/tera.1420280302 

[viii] Rarokar NR, Menghani S, Kerzare D, Khedekar B. Progress in synthesis of monoglycerides for use in pharmaceuticals. J Exp Food Chem. 2017 July; 3(3). https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/progress-in-synthesis-of-monoglycerides-for-use-in-food-andpharmaceuticals-2472-0542-1000128.pdf

[ix] EFSA ANS Panel. Scientific opinion on the re-evaluation of mono- and di-glycerides of fatty acids (E471) as food additives. EFSA Journal. 2017;15(11):5045. https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.5045

Please see "Caffeine or stimulant herbs added to boost caffeine content or have a stimulant effect" for more information.

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

  • Comfrey contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids that when taken internally are toxic and can cause severe liver injury.[i]
  • Internal comfrey use has been associated with liver cancer in animals.[ii]
  • While topical use of comfrey is generally regarded as a safe, comfrey should not be taken internally.

 


[i] Betz, J.M., Eppley, R.M., Taylor, W.C., Andrzejewski, D. (1994). Determination of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in commercial comfrey products (Symphytum sp.). J Pharm Sci, 83(5), 649-653. DOI: 10.1002/jps.2600830511

[ii] (2017). Comfrey. In LiverTox: Clinical and research information on drug-induced liver injury [internet]. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK548370/  

Please see "Chaparral (Larrea tridentata)" for more information.

Please see "Artificial colors" for more information.

Please see "DHEA" for more information. 

Please see "Genetically modified (GM) salmon or any other GM animal/seafood products" for more information.

  • DHEA is a hormone produced chiefly by the adrenal glands that has many regulatory functions in the body.
  • There are numerous potential side effects with using supplemental DHEA. For example, an excess of DHEA can promote tumor growth, encourage liver toxicity, and disrupt hormone balance, which can produce a wide range of symptoms including facial hair on women and breast swelling in men.[i] [ii] [iii]
  • Naturopaths and medical doctors do not recommend supplementing with DHEA unless blood levels have been checked and proven low.
  • It is for these reasons that we do not sell DHEA and feel that self-supplementation with DHEA, and self-diagnosis of low DHEA levels, is inappropriate and potentially dangerous.
  • We do carry homeopathic versions of DHEA, a highly diluted, safe form that is believed to stimulate the body’s innate ability to re-balance itself.

 


[i] Dehyroepiandrosterone and Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. University of Rochester Medical Center Health Encyclopedia. Retrieved January 25, 2021. https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=167&contentid=dhea

[ii] Dehydroepiandrosterone. (n.d.). Retrieved January 25, 2021, from https://www.stlukes-stl.com/health-content/medicine/33/000299.htm#:~:text=High%20doses%20of%20DHEA%20may,liver%20disease%20should%20avoid%20DHEA.

[iii] Rutkowski, K., Sowa, P., Rutkowska-Talipska, J., Kuryliszyn-Moskal, A. Rutowski, R. (2014). Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA): Hypes or Hopes.Drugs, 74, 1195-1207.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

  • Food-grade diatomaceous earth is Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA for the intended use as an inert ingredient in packaging materials that will come in contact with foods (such as paper and paperboards), in molds used to shape foods, and in small amounts as an anticaking agent in animal feed.
  • Diatomaceous earth’s GRAS status only applies to the above intended use and is not approved to be sold as a supplement for human consumption.
  • Until diatomaceous earth is recognized as a legal supplement by the FDA we will not carry it.[i]

 


[i] https://www.fda.gov/food/dietary-supplements

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

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Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information.

Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information.

Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information. 

Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information. 

Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information.

Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information.

Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information.

Please see "Synthetic vitamin E" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information. 

Please see "Genetically modified (GM) salmon or any other GM animal/seafood products" for more information.

Please see "Artificial fats" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Artificial fats" for more information.
Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information

Please see "Preservatives" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "GMO produced stevia glycosides" for more information.

Please see "Genetically modified (GM) salmon or any other GM animal/seafood products" for more information.

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information
  • Despite significant public opposition and uncertainty about the safety of GM animals, the FDA approved GM AquAdvantage® salmon for sale in the United States.
  • AquAdvantage salmon are genetically modified to produce growth hormone continually, causing the fish to grow much larger and faster than conventionally-raised farmed salmon.
  • These “frankenfish” pose a great risk to the environment and wild fish populations, should they escape into the wild. Although the producer of GM salmon has said they are taking steps to prevent cross-breeding with wild fish, their techniques are not 100% effective and the fish are capable of breeding in the wild with brown trout, a fish commonly found in the waters around the AquAdvantage salmon hatchery.[i]
  • Because we believe food should be as natural as possible and should have a long history of use or be proven safe, we will never carry AquAdvantage salmon or any other animal that has been genetically modified.

 


[i] Oke KB, Westley PAH, Moreau DRT, Fleming IA. Hybridization between genetically modified Atlantic salmon and wild brown trout reveals novel ecological interactions. Proc R Soc B. 2013 280 20131047.

  • Although geranium is a naturally occurring mineral and is even found in trace amounts in some foods (usually less than 5 parts per million), it is not essential for normal bodily function.[i]
  • There are numerous human case reports of renal toxicity and even death linked to prolonged intake of germanium products.[ii] [iii]

 


[i] Schauss A. G. (1991). Nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity in humans from organogermanium compounds and germanium dioxide. Biological trace element research, 29(3), 267–280. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03032683

[ii] Tao, S. H., & Bolger, P. M. (1997). Hazard assessment of germanium supplements. Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology : RTP, 25(3), 211–219. https://doi.org/10.1006/rtph.1997.1098

[iii] Schauss A. G. (1991). Nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity in humans from organogermanium compounds and germanium dioxide. Biological trace element research, 29(3), 267–280. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03032683

  • There are three glycols occasionally added to supplements that Natural Grocers does not allow: Polyethylene glycol (PEG), propylene glycol, and propylene glycol alginate (alginic acid from seaweed esterified with propylene glycol).[i]
  • PEG, most commonly derived from petroleum, can be contaminated with trace amounts of 1,4-dioxane, a human carcinogen. [ii] It can also cause mild to life-threatening hypersensitivity in some individuals.[iii]
  • Propylene glycol in large oral doses is associated with central nervous system depression, lactic acidosis, seizures, and red blood cell destruction (hemolysis).[iv]

 


[i] Hasenhuettl, G.L., Hartel, R.W. (Eds) (2008). Food emulsifiers and their applications (2nd ed). New York, NY: Springer.

[ii] Wilbur, S, Jones, D., Risher JF, Crawford, J., Tencza, B., Llados, F., …Lockwood, L. (2012). Toxicological Profile for 1,4-dioxane. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (US). APPENDIX D, HEALTH ADVISORY. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK153666/

[iii] Wenande, E., & Garvey, L. H. (2016). Immediate-type hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols: a review. Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 46(7), 907–922. https://doi.org/10.1111/cea.12760

[iv] Glover, M. L., & Reed, M. D. (1996). Propylene glycol: the safe diluent that continues to cause harm. Pharmacotherapy, 16(4), 690–693. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1875-9114.1996.tb03655.x

  • Most of the stevia glycosides produced as commercial sweeteners (reb M, reb D, and sometimes reb A) are made using genetically modified organisms (GMO).
  • Some stevia glycosides use enzymes harvested from genetically modified micro-organisms to extract the glycosides from the stevia leaf.[i] 
  • Some stevia glycosides don’t even use the stevia leaf for extraction and instead rely on a genetically modified yeast fed genetically modified food (usually from corn) to produce the glycosides.[ii]
  • We believe that if GMOs are used in any part of a food, including the processing, whether they remain in the final product or not, that product is genetically modified and therefore we do not carry it.[iii]

 


[i] What do we mean by Non-GMO? (n.d.). Retrieved November 16, 2020, from https://purevia.com/Nature/Non-GMO.aspx

[ii] Questions About EverSweet™ Stevia Sweetener. (n.d.). Retrieved November 16, 2020, from https://www.cargill.com/food-beverage/na/eversweet-faqs

[iii] Roseboro, K. (2019, December 18). Experts: Non-GMO Certification of GMO-Derived Sweetener Sets a 'Dangerous Precedent'. Retrieved November 16, 2020, from https://www.ecowatch.com/eversweet-non-gmo-certification-2603754941.html

  • Graviola is frequently promoted as having an anti-cancer effect. While some in vitro research has shown graviola to possess anti-cancer effects with certain cell lines, much more research is needed, including well-designed studies on humans.[i]
  • There is some concern that compounds in graviola may be neurotoxic or contribute to neurodegeneration.[ii]
  • When it comes to cancer treatment, we believe in providing products to improve overall function and promote optimal health so the body can heal itself. For those who wish to employ alternative treatments we encourage them to work closely with their health practitioner.

 


[i] Rady, I., Bloch, M.B., Chamcheu, R-C., N., Mbeumi, S.B., Anwar, M.R., Mohamed, H., ...Chamcheu, J.C. (2018). Anticancer properties of graviola (Annona muricata):  a comprehensive mechanistic review. Oxid Med Cell Longev, 2018; 1826170. doi: 10.1155/2018/1826170

[ii] Höllerhage, M., Rösler, T.W., Berjas, M., Luo, R., Tran, K., Richards, K.M., ...Smith, R.E. (2015). Neurotoxicity of dietary supplements from Annonaceae species. Int J Toxicol, 34(6), 543-550. https://doi.org/10.1177%2F1091581815602252

Please see "Chaparral (Larrea tridentata)" for more information.

Please see "Graviola (Annonna muricata)" for more information.

Please see "Caffeine or stimulant herbs added to boost caffeine content or have a stimulant effect" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Human growth hormone (HGH)" for more information.

  • HGH is a hormone released by the pituitary gland that is involved in growth and repair of organs and tissues. While an injectable form is approved by prescription for a limited number of diseases; it is often touted as an anti-aging therapy and/or used to enhance sports performance.
  • Side effects associated with the use of HGH include edema, carpal tunnel syndrome, joint pain, muscle pain, fatigue, and elevated cholesterol and glucose. [i] [ii]
  • The use of HGH should be regulated by a trained doctor for specific medical conditions.
  • We do carry homoeopathic versions of HGH, a highly diluted, safe form that is believed to stimulate the body's innate ability to re-balance itself.

 


[i] (2019, Sept.). Human growth hormone. US Drug Enforcement Administration. Retrieved January 13, 2021 from https://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_chem_info/hgh.pdf

[ii] US Food and Drug administration. (2020, October 8). Import alert 66- 7 one: detention without physical examination of human growth hormone (HGH), also known as somatropin. Retrieved from https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/cms_ia/importalert_204.html

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Please see 'Chemically modified fats' for more information.

  • When iron comes in contact with water and oxygen, it oxidizes. Rust is a type of iron oxide.[i]
  • Iron oxide nanoparticles have been found in significant amounts in commercial iron oxide food pigments. Iron oxide nanoparticles pose a threat to the workers who handle iron oxide and the consumers who consume it. Iron oxide nanoparticles have been shown to accumulate in the liver, kidneys, lungs, and brains of animals and nanoparticles of many varieties are known to induce inflammation.[ii] [iii] [iv] 
  • We will never carry any supplement that contains iron oxide either as a color additive or as a source of iron. If iron supplementation is needed, non-oxidized forms of iron (e.g. fumarate, gluconate, glycinate) are available.

 


[i] Oxidation and reduction - Redox, rusting and iron - (CCEA) - GCSE Chemistry (Single Science) Revision - CCEA - BBC Bitesize. (n.d.). Retrieved December 14, 2020, from https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z7rswty/revision/1

[ii] Voss, L., Hiao, I-L. Ebisch, M., Vidmar, J., Drejack, N., Böhmert, L. …Sieg, H. (2020). The presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the food pigment E172. Food Chem, 327, 127000. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2020.127000

[iii] Sadeghi, L., Babadi,V.Y., Espanani, H.R. (2015). Toxic effects of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles on the liver and lung tissue. Bratisl Lek Listy, 116(6), 373-378. DOI: 10.4149/bll_2015_071

[iv] Seaton, A., Tran. L., Aitken, R., Donaldson, K. (2010). Nanoparticles, human health hazard and regulation. J R Soc Interface, 7(suppl 1), s119-s129. doi: 10.1098/rsif.2009.0252.focus

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Please see "Caffeine or stimulant herbs added to boost caffeine content or have a stimulant effect" for more information. 

Please see Genetically modified (GM) salmon or any other GM animal/seafood product" for more information.
  • The US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) lists kratom as a ‘drug of concern’ to be watched, citing concerns of the herb’s possible addictive and abuse potential, and possible side effects.[i] While not regulated as a controlled substance by the DEA, several states and countries have banned kratom.[ii] [iii]
  • Kratom is not protected under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) because the FDA considers it a new dietary ingredient with no history of marketing as a supplement prior to 1994, which makes its sale as a dietary supplement illegal.[iv] 

 


[i] Drug Enforcement Administration. (April 2020). Katom [Drug Fact Sheet]. U.S. Department of Justice. https://www.dea.gov/sites/default/files/2020-06/Kratom-2020_0.pdf

[ii] Brown. M. (May 6, 2016). States ban kratom supplement over abuse worries. U.S. News. Retrieved January 14, 2021 from https://www.usnews.com/news/us/articles/2016-05-20/states-ban-kratom-supplement-over-abuse-worries

[iii] Kraoma. (August 7, 2020). Kratom legality 2021: map, legal status, and ban updates. Kraoma.com. Retrieved January 14, 2021 from  https://kraoma.com/kratom-legality-united-states/

[iv] U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2018, February 21). FDA oversees destruction and recall of kratom products; and reiterates its concern on risks assoiciated with this opioid [Press release]. https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-oversees-destruction-and-recall-kratom-products-and-reiterates-its-concerns-risks-associated

More information coming soon.

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Please see "Chaparral (Larrea tridentata)" for more information.

We have limited the number of weight loss and energy enhancing products on our shelves that contain ingredients that may be harmful to some individuals, such as kola nut, citrus aurantium extract, pseudoephedrine and guarana (due to high amounts of caffeine).

Please see "Talc" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

  • Methylsynephine is a stimulant not approved for use as a supplement in the United States. Therefore, any supplement containing methylsynephrine is considered “adulterated” or “misbranded” making its sale in the US illegal.[i]
  • Its use has been associated with nausea, vomiting, agitation, tachycardia (abnormal increased heart rate), chest pain, and even cardiac arrest. [ii]
  • Not only do we feel this ingredient poses risks to those who might take it, but we carefully screen our products to ensure that they do not contain pharmaceutical drugs masquerading as dietary supplements and we do not condone the illegal use of this ingredient in any dietary supplement.

 


[i] (2016, March 31). Recent FDA action on dietary supplements for which the product labeling lists methyl seneff written as a dietary ingredient [Constituent update]. https://www.fda.gov/food/cfsan-constituent-updates/recent-fda-action-dietary-supplements-which-product-labeling-lists-methylsynephrine-dietary

[ii] Cohen, P.A., Avula, B., Venhuis, B., Travis, J.C., Wang, Y-H., Kahn, I.A. (2016, April 7). Pharmaceutical doses of the banned stimulant oxilofrine found in dietary supplements sold in the USA. Drug testing and analysis, 9 (1), 135-142. https://doi.org/10.1002/dta.1976

Please see "Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa)" for more information.

Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives"' for more information.

Please see "Methylsynephrine" for more information.
Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.
Please see "Methylsynephrine" for more information.
  • Parabens have been shown to act as weak xenoestrogens and may cause hormone disruption.[i] [ii]
  • While we favor products that do not use parabens and have encouraged any manufacturers that do use parabens in their products to change their formulations, it may not be possible to change the preservative in some products due to molecular interactions.
  • Additionally, it is important to understand that all preservatives can be problematic and have health-associated risks. In some cases, these risks and problems may be outweighed by the even bigger problems, such as life-threatening bacteria and/or molds, that could occur without the use of preservatives.

 


[i] n.a. Analysis finds hormone disruptor used in cosmetics in nearly 50 different foods. Environmental Working Group. April 8, 2015. https://www.ewg.org/release/analysis-finds-hormone-disruptor-used-cosmetics-nearly-50-different-foods

[ii] Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants. 67th report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/43592/WHO_TRS_940_eng.pdf?sequence=1

• Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a naturally occurring trans-fat that has many health supporting benefits. The CLA that is found in supplements is made via the partial hydrogenation of sunflower oil and is identical to CLA found naturally occurring in grass-fed dairy products that has demonstrated health supportive benefits.

• See “Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "White kidney bean" for more information. 

Please see "White kidney bean" for more information. 

Please see "Parabens" for more information.
Please see "Parabens" for more information.
Please see "Glycols" for more information.

More information coming soon.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.
  • High amounts of iodine can be dangerous; adverse reactions include gastrointestinal symptoms, goiter, hypothyroidism (especially in people with a prior history of thyroid problems), a worsening of autoimmune thyroid conditions, and possibly even thyroid cancer.[i] [ii] [iii] [iv]
  • Because of such potential problems, the use of high dose iodine therapy should be supervised by a doctor.

 


[i] Zaletel, K., Gaberšček, S. (2011). Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: from genes to the disease. Curr Genomics, 12(8), 576-588. doi:  10.2174/138920211798120763

[ii] Kharrazian, D. (2010). Why do I still have thyroid symptoms? When my lab tests are normal. Garden City, NY: Morgan James.

[iii] Liontiris, M.I., Mazokopakis, E.E. (2017). A concise review of Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and the importance of iodine, selenium, vitamin D and gluten on the autoimmunity and dietary management of HT patients. Points that need more investigation. Hell J Nucl Med, 20(1), 51-56. Retrieved from http://www.nuclmed.gr/wp/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/10.pdf 

[iv] Institute of Medicine Food and Nutrition Board. (2001). Dietary reference intakes for vitamin A, vitamin K, arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, silicon, vanadium, and zinc. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

  • Pregnenolone is a precursor to DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) and other hormones, such as estrogen and testosterone.
  • There are numerous potential side effects of using supplemental pregnenolone, which can be similar to the side effects of using DHEA. For more details see the DHEA section above.
  • Naturopaths and Medical Doctors do not recommend supplementing with pregnenolone unless blood levels have been checked and proven low. It is for these reasons that we don’t sell pregnenolone and feel that self-supplementation with pregnenolone, and self-diagnosis of low pregnenolone levels, is inappropriate and potentially dangerous.
  • We do carry homeopathic versions of pregnenolone, a highly diluted, safe form that is believed to stimulate the body’s innate ability to re-balance itself.
  • Many preservatives have dubious safety profiles. Some are known or likely carcinogens; many are endocrine disruptors; some interfere with fetal and early childhood development or are linked to hyperactivity in children; others are toxic to the kidneys; some interfere with how important vitamins and minerals are used by the body; many are petroleum-derived and, in some cases, coal-tar derived; and some are detrimental to the environment. [i] [ii] [iii] [iv] [v] [vi] [vii] [viii] [ix] [x] [xi] [xii]
  • There is a real need for certain liquid supplements to have some preservatives due to the serious potential for mold or bacteria to develop without them. We've allowed the least harmful preservatives in a limited number of products because there are no good natural alternatives. The use of some artificial preservatives is a better than life-threatening mold and bacteria forming.

 


[i] The Proposition 65 List. (n.d.). Retrieved February 01, 2021, from https://oehha.ca.gov/proposition-65/proposition-65-list

[ii] National Toxicology Program. (2016). 14th report on carcinogens. US Department of Health and Human Services. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/content/profiles/butylatedhydroxyanisole.pdf

[iii] Generally Recognized as Safe – But is it? (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.ewg.org/research/ewg-s-dirty-dozen-guide-food-additives/generally-recognized-as-safe-but-is-it

[iv] EWG's Dirty Dozen Guide to Food Additives. (2014, November 12). Retrieved February 01, 2021, from https://www.ewg.org/research/ewg-s-dirty-dozen-guide-food-additives 

[v] n.a. Final report on the safety assessment of EDTA, calcium disodium EDTA, diammonium EDTA, dipotassium EDTA, disodium EDTA, TEA-EDTA, tetrasodium EDTA, tripotassium EDTA, trisodium EDTA, HEDTA, and trisodium HEDTA. Int J Toxicol. 2002 Oct;21(2_suppl):95-142. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1080/10915810290096522#articleCitationDownloadContainer

[vi] McCann D, Barrett A, Cooper A, et al. Food additives and hyperactive behavior in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet. 2007 Nov 3; 370(9598):1560-1567. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=McCann+D+(2007).+Food+additives+and+hyperactive+behaviour+in+3-year-old+and+8%2F9-year-old+children+in+the+community%3A+a+randomised%2C+double-blinded%2C+placebo+controlled+trial.+Lancet%2C+370%2C+1560-156

[vii] Van De Sande MMH, Wirtz S, Vos E, Verhagen H. Diamine tetra acetic acid as a food additive. Eur J Nutr & Food Safety. 2014;4(4):408-423. http://www.journalrepository.org/media/journals/EJNFS_30/2014/Jul/Sande442014EJNFS10405_1.pdf

[viii] (n.d.). Retrieved from https://cspinet.org/eating-healthy/chemical-cuisine#propyleneglycol

[ix] Burton GW, Traber MG, Acuff RV, et al. Human plasma and tissue alpha-tocopherol concentrations in response to supplementation with deuterated natural and synthetic vitamin E. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Apr;67(4):669-684. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9537614

[x] Van De Sande MMH, Wirtz S, Vos E, Verhagen H. Diamine tetra acetic acid as a food additive. Eur J Nutr & Food Safety. 2014;4(4):408-423. http://www.journalrepository.org/media/journals/EJNFS_30/2014/Jul/Sande442014EJNFS10405_1.pdf

[xi] n.a. (Nov 18, 2015) Ethoxyquin: EFSA safety assessment inconclusive. European Food Safety Authority.  http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/press/news/151118

[xii] Bucheli-Witschel M, Egli T. Environmental fate and microbial degradation of aminopolycarboxylic acids. FEMS Microbio Rev. 2001 Jan;25(1):69-106. https://academic.oup.com/femsre/article/25/1/69/606255

Please see "Preservatives" for more information. 

Please see "Preservatives" for more information. 

Please see "Preservatives" for more information. 

Please see "Glycols" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

More information coming soon.

Please see "GMO-produced stevia glycosides" for more information.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

Please see "GMO-produced stevia glycosides" for more information.

Please see "GMO-produced stevia glycosides" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Genetically modified (GM) salmon or any other GM animal/seafood products" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

More information coming soon.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information. 

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information. 

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Graviola (Annonna muricata)" for more information.

  • Soy leghemoglobin is a novel protein from a genetically modified yeast. It is FDA approved as a color additive and is used to give some beef analogue products a meaty taste and red color when uncooked.[i]
  • Soy leghemoglobin has no proven track record of human consumption and has had very little testing to prove its safety for long-term use.[ii] [iii] [iv]
  • We whole-heartedly support efforts to reduce the environmental impact of our food and improve animal welfare, but any new product introduced to meet this end must also be proven safe and free of harmful ingredients, including genetically modified ingredients.

 


[i] Listing of Color Additives Exempt from Certification; Soy Leghemoglobin; 84 Fed. Reg. 37573 (Aug 1, 2019) (to be codified at 21 CFR 73). Available at https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/08/01/2019-16374/listing-of-color-additives-exempt-from-certification-soy-leghemoglobin

[ii] Fraser, R.Z., Shitut, M., Agrawal, P., Mendes, O., Klapholz, S. (2018). Safety evaluation of soy leghemoglobin protein preparation derived from Pichia pastoris, intended for use as a flavor catalyst in plant-based meat. Int J Toxicol, 37(3), 241-262. doi: 10.1177/1091581818766318

[iii] n.a. (June 25, 2019). Rat feeding study suggests the impossible burger may not be safe to eat. GMO Science. https://www.gmoscience.org/rat-feeding-studies-suggest-the-impossible-burger-may-not-be-safe-to-eat/ 

[iv] Jin, Y., He, X., Andoh-Kumi,K., Fraser, R.Z., Lu, M., Goodman, R.E. (2018). Evaluating potential risks of food allergy and toxicity of soy leghemoglobin expressed in Pichia pastoris. Mol Nutr Food Res, 62(1), 1700297. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201700297

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Preservatives" for more information. 

Please see "GMO-produced stevia glycosides" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Artificial sweeteners" for more information.

Please see "Comfrey (Symphytum officinale), internal sources" for more information.

  • Chemically synthesized from petroleum products, synthetic vitamin E supplements consists of eight isomers (compounds with the same formula but different arrangements), of which only four meet the vitamin E requirements of humans to varying degrees.[i] [ii]
  • In numerous studies, synthetic vitamin E supplements have been shown to be inferior to natural vitamin E supplements in bioavailability, resulting in as little as half the plasma and tissue levels of vitamin E obtained by an equal weight of natural vitamin E.[iii] [iv]

 


[i] Higdon J. Vitamin E. Linus Pauling Insititute: Micronutrient Information Center. Updated May 2015. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/vitamin-E

[ii] Challem J. Natural vs. Synthetic Vitamin E. Nutrition Science News. 2001 Nov. Available at: http://www.chiro.org/nutrition/FULL/Natural_vs_Synthetic_Vitamin_E.shtml

[iii] Office of Dietary Supplements. Vitamin E Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health website. Updated Nov 3, 2016. Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional/

[iv] Burton GW, Traber MG, Acuff RV, et al. Human plasma and tissue alpha-tocopherol concentrations in response to supplementation with deuterated natural and synthetic vitamin E. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Apr;67(4):669-684. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9537614

  • Talc is sometimes used in supplements to prevent ingredients from clumping and sticking to machinery during the formation of tablets.
  • Talc can be contaminated with asbestos, a known carcinogen that also causes lung disease.[i] [ii] [iii]
  • Talc poses the greatest danger to workers exposed to it, but consumer exposure to talc may also increase the risk of developing cancer.[iv] [v]
  • A Magnesium Silicate (Talc) excipient exception has been made for the Mayway Chinese Patent medicine products available at select stores. After extensive research we have been unable to locate another supplier of Chinese Patent medicine that meets our additional quality standards.

 


[i] FAQs: Modernization of the USP Talc Monograph. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2021, from https://www.usp.org/frequently-asked-questions/talc-monograph

[ii] Richards, M. (2020, March 9). FDA in brief: FDA releases final report of talc- containing cosmetic products tested for asbestos. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/news-events/fda-brief/fda-brief-fda-releases-final-report-talc-containing-cosmetic-products-tested-asbestos

[iii] Asbestos and Cancer Risk. (n.d.). Retrieved January 26, 2021, from https://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/asbestos.html

[iv] (2015, September 30). Talc used in food processing a health hazard, say researchers. Retrieved from https://www.foodprocessing.com.au/content/food-design-research/news/talc-use-in-food-processing-a-health-hazard-say-researchers-859641872

[v] Chang, C. J., Yang, Y. H., Chen, P. C., Peng, H. Y., Lu, Y. C., Song, S. R., & Yang, H. Y. (2019). Stomach Cancer and Exposure to Talc Powder without Asbestos via Chinese Herbal Medicine: A Population-Based Cohort Study. International journal of environmental research and public health, 16(5), 717. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050717

  • Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone and although it is often touted as a miracle cure, using testosterone supplements and/or cream is not without risks.
  • Potential adverse effects of exogenous testosterone include acne, infertility, an increased risk of adverse heart events, and erythrocytosis (an increase in red blood cells that can increase the risk of blood clotting and other complications). [i] [ii]
  • Naturopaths and Medical Doctors do not recommend using testosterone cream unless blood levels have been checked and proven low. It is for the above reasons that we do not sell testosterone cream and feel that self-supplementation with testosterone, and self-diagnosis of low testosterone levels, is inappropriate and potentially dangerous.

 


[i] Grech, A., Breck, J., Heidelbaugh, J. (2014). Adverse effects of testosterone replacement therapy: an update on the evidence and controvery. Ther Adv Drug Saf, 5(5), 190-200. doi: 10.1177/2042098614548680

[ii] Gilbert, K., Cimmino, C. B., Beebe, L. C., & Mehta, A. (2017). Gaps in Patient Knowledge About Risks and Benefits of Testosterone Replacement Therapy. Urology, 103, 27–33. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2016.12.066

Please see "Preservatives" for more information. 

  • Titanium dioxide is mainly used as a colorant and brightening agent in food and supplements. Although manufacturers and government agencies continue to contend that the absorption of titanium dioxide from oral exposure is very low, there is research to suggest that humans and animals actually do absorb it and that even small amounts can lead to negative physiological changes.[i]
  • Titanium dioxide may cause damage in the intestines without even being absorbed into the body. Research suggests that chronic ingestion of titanium dioxide induces low-grade inflammation of the colon and alters gut homeostasis in ways that may contribute to the development of autoimmune conditions, and of chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal issues such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease and colon cancer.[ii] [iii] [iv]
  • Children tend to have the greatest exposure to titanium dioxide because they tend to consume more colored products that contain titanium dioxide than adults, but very little research has been done to assess their vulnerability to it. Studies on rodents suggest that young animals may be more susceptible than adults to developing adverse effects after ingesting titanium dioxide.[v]

 


[i] Pele, L.C., Thoree, V., Bruggraber, S. F.A., Koller, D., Thompson, R, P.H., Lomer, M.C., Powell, J.J. (2015). Pharmaceutical/food grade titanium dioxide particles are absorbed into the bloodstream of human volunteers. Part Fibre Toxicol, 12, 26. doi: 10.1186/s12989-015-0101-9

[ii] Winkler, H. C., Notter, T., Meyer, U., & Naegeli, H. (2018). Critical review of the safety assessment of titanium dioxide additives in food. Journal of nanobiotechnology16(1), 51. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12951-018-0376-8

[iii] Bettini, S., Boutet-Robinet, E., Cartier, C., Coméra, C., Gaultier, E., Dupuy, J., …Houdeau, E. (2017). Food-grade TiO2 impairs intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis, initiates preneoplastic lesions and promotes aberrant crypt development in the rat colon. Sci Rep, 7, 40373. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep40373

[iv] Pinget, G., Tan, J., Janac, B., Kaakoush, N.O., Angelatos, A.S., O’Sullivan, J., …Macia, L. (2019). Impact of the food additive titanium dioxide (E171) on gut microbiota-host interaction. Front Nutr, 6, 57. DOI: 10.3389/fnut.2019.00057

[v] Winkler, H. C., Notter, T., Meyer, U., & Naegeli, H. (2018). Critical review of the safety assessment of titanium dioxide additives in food. Journal of nanobiotechnology16(1), 51. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12951-018-0376-8

  • Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a naturally occurring trans-fat that has many health-supporting benefits. The CLA that is found in supplements is made via the partial hydrogenation of sunflower oil and is identical to CLA found naturally occurring in grass-fed dairy products that have demonstrated health-supportive benefits.
  • Please see "Chemically modified fats" for more information.

Please see "Parabens" for more information.

Please see "Artificial flavors" for more information.

  • Although real vanilla is composed of hundreds of flavor compounds, vanillin is the one most responsible for the flavor we associate with vanilla.
  • Vanillin can be produced from yeast that has been genetically modified. These yeasts produce vanillin glucoside by fermenting glucose.
  • Because vanillin is made from genetically modified yeasts and is not natural, we do not carry products that contain it.
More information coming soon.

References available upon request